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Hey, What Could Go Wrong?!

30 Jan

You can add BP to the list for the Deepwater Horizon:
An oil leak was discovered on the afternoon of 22 April when a large oil slick began to spread at the former rig site.  According to the Flow Rate Technical Group, the leak amounted to about 4.9 million barrels (210,000,000 US gal; 780,000 m3) of oil, exceeding the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill as the largest ever to originate in U.S.-controlled waters and the 1979 Ixtoc I oil spill as the largest spill in the Gulf of Mexico

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  1. Ken Foreman

    Ken ForemanNo Gravatar

    January 30, 2013 at 2:30 pm

    One of the largest dangers of unregulated Capitolism is "groupthink", where employees and consumers go along while whistle-blowers are shunned or ignored:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_Shuttle_Challenger_disaster#Use_as_case_study

    The Challenger accident has frequently been used as a case study in the study of subjects such as engineering safety, the ethics of whistle-blowing, communications, group decision-making, and the dangers of groupthink. It is part of the required readings for engineers seeking a professional license in Canada and other countries. Roger Boisjoly, the engineer who had warned about the effect of cold weather on the O-rings, left his job at Morton Thiokol and became a speaker on workplace ethics. He argues that the caucus called by Morton Thiokol managers, which resulted in a recommendation to launch, "constituted the unethical decision-making forum resulting from intense customer intimidation." For his honesty and integrity leading up to and directly following the shuttle disaster, Roger Boisjoly was awarded the Prize for Scientific Freedom and Responsibility from the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Many colleges and universities have also used the accident in classes on the ethics of engineering.